The Lismacloskey Garden at the Ulster Folk Museum

The Rectory with a pair of Irish junipers either side of the central path.

The Rectory with a pair of Irish junipers either side of the central path.

Looking down the garden path from the front door of Lismacloskey Rectory.

Looking down the garden path from the front door of Lismacloskey Rectory.

The volunteers at Lismacloskey Garden at the Ulster Folk Museum near Belfast are busy getting the garden back into shape after a very wet but mild winter. The weather obviously suited the Irish Primroses introduced by the Fitzgerald Nursery in recent years as they are putting on a great show in the long bed leading down to the shady area where daffodils such as the historic Narcissus ‘Van Sion’ dating from about 1620 have been naturalised.
The daffodils naturalised under the trees watched over by a willow hedgehog.

The daffodils naturalised under the trees watched over by a willow hedgehog.

The south facing border with a selection of Irish Primroses

The south facing border with a selection of Irish Primroses

Primula ‘Avondale’ (the label in the photograph refers to a different plant not shown in the picture) looks jaunty with Penstemon ‘Evelyn’, a lovely Irish variety introduced by the former Slieve Donard Nursery, forming a green background while P. ‘Glengarriff’ tones perfectly with Pulmonaria ‘Blake’s Silver’.
P. 'Glengarriff' and Pulmonaria 'Blake's Silver'

P. ‘Glengarriff’ and Pulmonaria ‘Blake’s Silver’

Primula 'Avondale'

Primula ‘Avondale’

Despite being only the end of March, Hypericum ‘Rowallane’ on the opposite side of the garden is in full bloom. Nearby Barbara Mayne is weeding carefully around P. ‘Guinevere’ which grows at the base of a willow support for Rosa ‘William Lobb’ while Lorna Goldstrom, the IGPS co-ordinator for the garden, tackles a bit of last minute pruning. The willow wigwam and the giant hedgehog which can be glimpsed behind the daffodils were specially constructed for the garden by Bob, the Museum’s resident willow weaver.
Lorna Goldstrom and Yvonne Penpraze talking to one of the Museum staff dressed in period costume.

Lorna Goldstrom and Yvonne Penpraze talking to one of the Museum staff dressed in period costume.

Volunteers Barbara Mayne and Lorna Goldstrom with Hypericum 'Rowallane' blooming in the background

Volunteers Barbara Mayne and Lorna Goldstrom with Hypericum ‘Rowallane’ blooming in the background

The Museum acknowledges the Society's work.

The Museum acknowledges the Society’s work.

With thanks to Maeve Bell for text and photographs.

Dedication of Escallonia ‘C. F. Ball’ – Tuesday, 28th June

Dedication of Escallonia ‘C. F. Ball’

This dedication is taking place at the National War Memorial Gardens, Islandbridge, Dublin.
It is a free event organised by the Office of Public Works(OPW) and we would like to see a good number of IGPS attend on the day. 
Tuesday, 28 June 2016 from 14:00 to 16:00 AT THE Irish National War Memorial Gardens
– via Con Colbert Road Islandbridge, Dublin 8, Ireland
Escallonia CF Ball Photograph from httpwww.vivaipriola.it

Escallonia CF Ball         Photograph from httpwww.vivaipriola.it

These gardens, designed by Sir Edward Lutyens, are dedicated to the memory of 49,400 Irish soldiers who died in the First World War. They are in a wonderful setting, along the River Liffey, and adjacent to the Phoenix Park. The gardens contain a sunken Rose Garden which will be at its best in mid-Summer when this event is planned.

Escallonia ‘C F Ball’ is named for Charles Frederick Ball, who was killed at Gallipoli in 1915. Charles Frederick Ball, who trained at Kew Gardens, was an Assistant Keeper at the National Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin  and advised at the Acton estate at Kilmacurragh, now, also, part of the National Botanic Gardens. Escallonia CF Ball is one seedling from several raised by him before the war, another –  ‘Alice’ – is named for his wife.

The Great War caused the demise of numerous gardens as so many staff volunteered for service in the British Army and other Allied Forces, never to return. The Irish Garden Plant Society is pleased to be able to help keep the memory of these people with us. This a free event, open to the public, but we hope that IGPS members who are free on Tuesday afternnoon, the 28th June, will attend to promote this Irish heritage plant.

Entrance to the garden is via Con Colbert Road where there is a small car park. Buses 51,68 and 69 from Aston Quay. Please note there are no facilities at this garden.

For more information on Dublin’s Commemorative Sites visit OPW Dublin Website

‘New and Exciting Herbaceous Perennials from around the World’ with Jimi Blake’

New and Exciting Herbaceous Perennials from around the World’ with Jimi Blake’, in association with Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council.

From left to right: Maeve Bell (IGPS Northern Area Chairperson) Philip Magennis (Arts and Heritage Officer, Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council), Jimi Blake and Barbara Kelso (IGPS Northern Area Committee Member who organises the lecture programme).

From left to right: Maeve Bell (IGPS Northern Area Chairperson) Philip Magennis (Arts and Heritage Officer, Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council), Jimi Blake and Barbara Kelso (IGPS Northern Area Committee Member who organises the lecture programme).

 The Northern Area Committee’s Spring Lecture, New and Exciting Herbaceous Perennials from around the World’ with Jimi Blake’, in association with Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council, was an entertaining and inspiring guide through Jimi’s favourite new long flowering perennials as featured in Hunting Brook Gardens. Jimi gave great insights into how to use them in planting schemes and also his own experiences of trialing them in the Irish garden. All of this was accompanied by superb photography of the individual plants and the adventurous and colourful planting combinations which are Jimi’s trademark. Everyone went home with a ticked list of ‘must have’ plants for the coming season and a resolve to seek them out.

An audience of around 140, comprising IGPS members and non-members, packed the Old Courthouse, Antrim, eager to hear Jimi Blake speak at the IGPS Northern Committee’s Spring Lecture.

An audience of around 140, comprising IGPS members and non-members, packed the Old Courthouse, Antrim, eager to hear Jimi Blake speak at the IGPS Northern Committee’s Spring Lecture.

 Hilary Glenn (left) and Maeve Bell (right) after Maeve presented flowers to Hilary to mark the completion of her 10 year term on the regional committee.

Hilary Glenn (left) and Maeve Bell (right) after Maeve presented flowers to Hilary to mark the completion of her 10 year term on the regional committee.

 IGPS Northern Area members after enjoying the Spring Lecture. From left to right: Lorna Greenwood, Maeve Bell, Yvonne Penpraze and Billy McCone after the Spring Lecture.

IGPS Northern Area members after enjoying the Spring Lecture. From left to right: Lorna Greenwood, Maeve Bell, Yvonne Penpraze and Billy McCone after the Spring Lecture.

 

Heritage Irish Plants – Plandaí Oidhreachta: Place a Pre-publication order now! €25

The Irish Society of Botanical Artists and The Irish Garden Plant Society have joined forces in a project titled Plandaí Oidhreachta, which celebrates our Heritage Plants. It highlights the wealth of good Irish Garden Plants and celebrates the beauty of botanical illustration. In late 2016, the end product of the collaboration will be an exhibition of original paintings and an accompanying book. The book will feature articles on a variety of plant themes that highlight Irish Garden Plants, especially those that came to being post the year 2000. Our latest snowdrops, dahlias and sweet pea will be featured along with primroses, iris and daffodils, among others groups of plants, including garden plants selected from the native Irish flora. We are happy to offer Society members and friends the opportunity to support this endeavour by pre-subscribing to the book. Measuring 240 x 260cm and with over 100 pages of content, it will be lavishly illustrated with botanical illustrations both old and new, and printed on high quality, silk-finish paper. Threescore artists, and more have been painting for the book in 2015 and early 2016.

 

The ISBA is handling pre-publication orders of the book: Please visit their website: Irish Botanical Artists for details. Heritae Irish Plants Publication Brochure 1

 

Oliver Schurmann – ‘Prairie Style Gardening in an Irish Climate’

A Report from Adam Whitbourn on Oliver Schurmann’s IGPS Munster lecture  ‘Prairie Style Gardening in an Irish Climate’on Tue 1st March.

Photo: LtoR – Oliver Schurmann (Mount Venus Nursery), Martin Edwardes (IGPS Munster Committee), Adam Whitbourn (IGPS Munster Committee)

Photo: LtoR – Oliver Schurmann (Mount Venus Nursery), Martin Edwardes (IGPS Munster Committee), Adam Whitbourn (IGPS Munster Committee)


Oliver gave an extremely interesting and informative lecture. His passion and knowledge of plants and great eye for design were evident throughout. He described his formative days of training in Germany where he first saw the prairie style of planting which influenced his development as a horticulturalist. He talked about the idea of bringing plant communities into the garden and used various examples of natural meadows and prairies from Ireland and abroad. He made many plant suggestions both as effective combinations and single specimens and took us through some gardens that he had designed and planted. I went away with a long wish list of plants which I will try to source at Oliver’s own Mount Venus Nursery in Rathfarnam, Dublin.