The Ceremonial Planting of Escallonia ‘C. F. Ball’ at the War Memorial Gardens.

The National War Memorial Gardens at Islandbridge, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, are dedicated to the memory of 49,400 Irish soldiers who died in the First World War. They are in a wonderful setting, along the River Liffey, and adjacent to the Phoenix Park.

Escallonia ‘C F Ball’ is named for Charles Frederick Ball, who was killed at Gallipoli in 1915. Charles Frederick Ball, who trained at Kew Gardens, was an Assistant Keeper at the National Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin  and advised at the Acton estate at Kilmacurragh, now, also, part of the National Botanic Gardens. Escallonia CF Ball is one seedling from several raised by him before the war, another –  ‘Alice’ – is named for his wife.

The Great War caused the demise of numerous gardens as so many staff volunteered for service in the British Army and other Allied Forces, never to return. The Irish Garden Plant Society is pleased to be able to help keep the memory of these people with us

A group from the Irish Garden Plant Society attended the ceremonial planting at the War Memorial Gardens on the 28th of June. It was a very dignified and surprisingly moving occasion. Billy McCone, IGPS Chairperson, opened with a short introduction and gave some background to C. F. Ball and his work.  Seamus O’Brien spoke of the links between the Acton family at Kilmacurragh and the National Botanic Gardens at Glasnevin. Peter Acton and his daughter Gemma spoke about the effect of WW1 on their family and the transformation of Europe in the intervening years.

Photographs from Maeve Bell

Billy McCone, IGPS Chairperson, addressing the group

Billy McCone, IGPS Chairperson, addressing the group

Escallonia C. F. Ball  Seamus O'Brien

Seamus O’Brien, of the National Botanic Gardens Kilmacurragh, presenting Escallonia ‘C. F. Ball’

 

Peter Acton with his daughter Gemma Acton accepting Escallonia 'C. F. Ball'

Peter Acton with his daughter Gemma Acton accepting Escallonia ‘C. F. Ball’

Escallonia C. F. Ball  Peter Acton and his daughter Gemma  (4)

Peter and Gemma Acton planting Escallonia ‘C. F. Ball’ at the National War Memorial at Islandbridge

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In attendance at the ceremonial planting of Escallonia ‘C. F. Ball’

 

Escallonia C. F. Ball  Ed Bowden Seamus O'Brien

Ed Bowden and Seamus O’Brien in attendance

Escallonia C. F. Ball Stephen Butler Brendan Sayers

Stephen Butler, Chairperson IGPS Leinster, with Brendan Sayers of the National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin.

 

 

A Visit to Hillsborough Castle Gardens, June 2016

 

 

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IGPS members visited Hillsborough Castle House and Garden on the 4th June. The House was built in the 1770s by Wills Hill 1st Marquis of Downshire and was remodelled in the 1800s and then again in the 20th century.
It passed to the British Goverment in 1922 and is now the official residence of the Royal Family when in N Ireland.
The Castle is set in 96 acres of garden and also has a lake. The front facade of the castle faces south on to the gardens. You will notice this in the pictures where the front patio has just had a complete makeover. Much work is still continuing at the moment so we were a little restricted on our visit. Strangely the sun did shine that day and everyone had a very pleasant afternoon, with many cafes in the village to visit afterwards.

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Hillsborough  (2)

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Hillsborough  (1)

 

Many thanks to Victor and Roz Henry for photographs

The Rectory Garden, Lismacloskey

Here’s some photos from Barbara Kelso of a recent IGPS visit to the Lismacloskey Rectory Garden, at the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum, Cultra, a few miles east of Belfast.  The sun shone, the garden was looking fantastic and all had a wonderful morning.
Just a little on the background of the garden:
The garden is a product of a partnership between the Museum and the IGPS.  Back in 1987, the IGPS was asked to design and plant a garden appropriate for a clergyman in rural Ireland around 1900. The house itself was built in 1717, but its interior has been furnished as it would have been around 1900.
A central straight path leads from the gate to the door, in front of the house there are two rectangular flower beds and the remainder of the garden is set out in an informal Robinsonian style. In keeping with the aims of the IGPS, as many as possible of the plants are old Irish cultivars. Many thanks go the the small team of volunteers, from within and outside the IGPS, who maintain the garden.
The Rectory Garden, Lismacloskey (2)

The Rectory Garden, Lismacloskey

The Rectory Garden, Lismacloskey (3)

The Rectory Garden, Lismacloskey

The Rectory Garden, Lismacloskey (4)

The Rectory Garden, Lismacloskey

Volunteer Margaret Newman with Victor Henry, Carol Dobson and Roz Henry

Volunteer Margaret Newman with Victor Henry, Carol Dobson and Roz Henry

Volunteers Maureen Reid and Marion Allen busy working in the borders

Volunteers Maureen Reid and Marion Allen busy working in the borders

Volunteers Rachel Owen, Marion Allen, Roz Henry and Margaret Newman. Margaret declared it was water in her wine bottle. We believe her!

Volunteers Rachel Owen, Marion Allen, Roz Henry and Margaret Newman. Margaret declared it was water in her wine bottle. We believe her!

Billy McCone, Barbara Kelso, with volunteers Lorna Goldstrom organiser of the volunteer group, Maureen Reid and Yvonne Penpraze

Billy McCone, Barbara Kelso, with volunteers Lorna Goldstrom organiser of the volunteer group, Maureen Reid and Yvonne Penpraze

Maeve Bell and Billy McCone

Maeve Bell and Billy McCone

Museum volunteer in period costume bringing in turf for the fire to make soda bread

Museum volunteer in period costume bringing in turf for the fire to make soda bread

The plant in the foreground is the Irish Heritage plant, Osteospermum 'Lady Leitrim' from County Donegal

The plant in the foreground is the Irish Heritage plant, Osteospermum ‘Lady Leitrim’ from County Donegal

The Rectory Garden, Lismacloskey (1)

The Rectory Garden, Lismacloskey

Our AGM weekend in Blarney, Co. Cork.

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Shirley Musgrave, Christine Fehily and Catherine McHale all obviously enjoying the garden visits at the weekend.

Many thanks to the Munster committee of the IGPS who organised our AGM weekend in Blarney, Co. Cork. It was a great success and enjoyed by all.

Our first garden visit of the weekend was to Blarney Castle Gardens where we had a range of wonderful guided tours and this set the tone of the weekend which we all continued to enjoy.

Click here to see an album of photographs from Blarney Castle Gardens. 

Click on the link to view an album of photographs from Mairead Harty’s  Poulacurry House

Click to view Mary Byrne’s Garden

The final garden of the weekend: Hester Forde’s, “Coosheen” in Glounthaune.

A “Thank You” to Martin Edwardes

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To mark Martin Edwarde’s ten years on the Munster committee of the IGPS Bruno Nicolai, Chairperson of the IGPS Munster committee, made this presentation at the AGM dinner in Blarney

 

 

IGPS Stand at Russborough

Stephen Butler, Mary Tobin, Ricky Shannon and Kirsten Walker on the IGPS stand at the Rare and Special Plant Sale at Russborough House

Stephen Butler, Mary Tobin, Ricky Shannon and Kirsten Walker on the IGPS stand at the Rare and Special Plant Sale at Russborough House

There was a big turnout for the Rare and Special Plant Sale at Russborough House today and the IGPS had a stand there with Stephen Butler, Ricky Shannon and Kirsten Walker meeting people and promoting the IGPS. Mary and I dropped in to say “Hello”

IGPS stand at Russborough  (1)

 

IGPS stand at Russborough  (3)

Stephen and Ricky on duty at the IGPS stand.

Lismacloskey Daffodils

Ireland and particularly the north of Ireland has a fine reputation for breeding daffodils and the garden at Lismacloskey Rectory in the Ulster Folk Museum, which is planted and maintained by volunteers from the IGPS and the Museum, now has a collection of almost 40 different cultivars.

Narcissus 'Mary Lou'

Narcissus ‘Mary Lou’

The chilly spring this year has meant their jaunty blooms ranging from deep yellow through orange, lemon and delicate pink to ivory white have last exceptionally well. One of our earlier flowers was the all-white trumpet daffodil, Narcissus ‘Empress of Ireland’ which was bred by the famous Guy Wilson before 1952 and received an Award of Garden Merit (AGM) from the RHS as recently as the 1990s. Two other white daffodils in the collection merit a special mention: the dainty and delectable N. ‘Mary Lou’ bred by Brian Duncan of Co Tyrone and N. ‘Glasnevin’ bred by Kate Reade of Carncairn Daffodils and named in 1995 for the bicentenary of the National Botanic Gardens. Kate is a long-standing Honorary Member of the Society, elected for her outstanding contribution to daffodil breeding.

Narcissus 'Coral Dance'

Narcissus ‘Coral Dance’

Some other cultivars bred by Brian Duncan which have delighted us this year include the pink-cupped N. ‘Cape Point’ and the flamboyant N. ‘Coral Dance’, a white and coral-pink double. The Northern region chose one of Brian’s introductions, N. ‘Tyrone Gold’ AGM, as one of the six plants to feature on their display banner.

Narcissus 'Lemon Cocktail'

Narcissus ‘Lemon Cocktail’

Many of the bulbs in the collection at Lismacloskey have been obtained from Nial Watson of Ringhaddy Daffodils in Co. Down www.ringhaddy-daffodils.com

. One of his own introductions is N. ‘Lemon Cocktail’; its blooms are not only a delicious sherbet-like lemon colour  but very long lasting in the garden and should be on anyone’s shopping list. Thinking of shopping lists, why not make a resolution to grow some of our own wonderful Irish varieties next year instead of a run-of-the-mill pack from the garden centre?

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Text and photographs from Maeve Bell. 

IGPS at the Clare Garden Festival

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A photo of the Irish Garden Plant Society stand at Clare Garden Festival today.

Bruno Nicolai had an IGPS stand at the Clare Garden Festival today – as well as presenting a talk to those attending.

A great day was had, with lots of requests for an IGPS branch to be set up in the west.

If there is anybody interested in helping set up a branch in the west, we would love to hear from you.

 

A Woodland Garden

A large group of IGPS members made their way to Co. Meath on Saturday, 23rd of April. We were blessed with good weather, and everybody thoroughly enjoyed the visit. The woodland was planted with a great mixture of native spring flowers and choice woodland plants with an imaginative uses of ivy as ground cover.

Photographs from Stephen Butler and Jenny Constable. 

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IGPS at Fota Plant Fair.

 

 

Blarney stand at Fota with Bruno Nicolai  (3)

The Plant Fair at Fota Island today with Bruno Nicolai promoting the Irish Garden Plant Society at the Blarney Castle Garden stand reminding all to come to the Blarney in Bloom Festival on the 10th of July

There was a huge attendance at the Plant Fair at Fota Island on Sunday, 17th April, and the IGPS had a presence there, sharing a stand with Blarney Castle Gardens to both promote the upcoming Blarney in Bloom Festival on the 10th of July and to promote the IGPS itself.

Bruno Nicolai, Chairperson of IGPS Munster, was at the stand and reported a very good response from those attending the fair. Bruno will also be at the upcoming Clare Garden Festival to promote interest in the IGPS and to deliver a talk.

Blarney stand at Fota with Bruno Nicolai  (2)

Caught by surprise!

Caught by surprise!

 

 

 

A Visit to David Ledsham’s Garden – 9th March

It was a testimony to David Ledsham’s garden that we enjoyed it enormously despite poor weather conditions. We met with so many beautiful plants, so well cultivated, that is was a joy from beginning to end. Hellebore, trilliums and primulas were especially fabulous.

Here are just a few photographs of plants which caught the eye.

Primula megaesifolia

Primula megaesifolia

Polylepsis australis, fabulously shaggy bark

Polylepsis australis, fabulously shaggy bark

Narcissus minor with fritillaries

Narcissus minor with fritillaries

 

Many thanks to Maeve Bell for the photographs!

Narcissus ‘Countess of Annesley’ An Irish cultivar presumed extinct – alive and well

Narcissus ‘Countess of Annesley’

 

An Irish cultivar presumed extinct – alive and well

 

Narcissus ‘Countess of Annesley’, a late nineteenth century, large early-flowered daffodil that originated at Castlewellan in Co. Down, Northern Ireland, and long presumed extinct, has recently been found alive and well in a number of Irish gardens. The discovery was made by Alwyn Sinnamon, Foreman Gardener at Castlewellan Arboretum and Annesley Garden, at Castlewellan, and it was possible to trace its identity using original descriptions and drawings of the cultivar.

Narcissus 'Countess of Annesley' SMALL IMAGE

Narcissus ‘Countess of Annesley’ is an extremely vigorous and distinctive daffodil with bright sulphur-yellow, twisted perianth segments and a rich full-yellow trumpet that’s reflexed at its apex.

The cultivar was first found by Thomas Ryan, Head Gardener to Hugh Annesley (1831-1908), the fifth Earl Annesley, and was named by William Frederick Burbidge, the former Veitchian plant hunter and Curator of the Trinity College Botanic Gardens in Dublin.

During the 1890s Narcissus ‘Countess of Annesley’ was grown as a cut flower in Ireland and the Isles of Scilly, and several tonnes of blooms were annually sold to the English and Scottish markets. It was planted en masse in front of Kew’s Great Palm House in the late 1890s, and it also became extremely popular in New Zealand.

During the twentieth century it was superseded by modern cultivars and was presumed extinct until plants were positively identified from stock at Castlewellan and nearby, at Rowallane Gardens. Further investigations have found a third population is thriving at Annesgrove House and Gardens in Co. Cork.

 

With thanks to Seamus O’Brien, National Botanic Gardens, Kilmacurragh, Co. Wicklow.

RHS Woody Plant Committee (corresponding member).

The Lismacloskey Garden at the Ulster Folk Museum

The Rectory with a pair of Irish junipers either side of the central path.

The Rectory with a pair of Irish junipers either side of the central path.

Looking down the garden path from the front door of Lismacloskey Rectory.

Looking down the garden path from the front door of Lismacloskey Rectory.

The volunteers at Lismacloskey Garden at the Ulster Folk Museum near Belfast are busy getting the garden back into shape after a very wet but mild winter. The weather obviously suited the Irish Primroses introduced by the Fitzgerald Nursery in recent years as they are putting on a great show in the long bed leading down to the shady area where daffodils such as the historic Narcissus ‘Van Sion’ dating from about 1620 have been naturalised.
The daffodils naturalised under the trees watched over by a willow hedgehog.

The daffodils naturalised under the trees watched over by a willow hedgehog.

The south facing border with a selection of Irish Primroses

The south facing border with a selection of Irish Primroses

Primula ‘Avondale’ (the label in the photograph refers to a different plant not shown in the picture) looks jaunty with Penstemon ‘Evelyn’, a lovely Irish variety introduced by the former Slieve Donard Nursery, forming a green background while P. ‘Glengarriff’ tones perfectly with Pulmonaria ‘Blake’s Silver’.
P. 'Glengarriff' and Pulmonaria 'Blake's Silver'

P. ‘Glengarriff’ and Pulmonaria ‘Blake’s Silver’

Primula 'Avondale'

Primula ‘Avondale’

Despite being only the end of March, Hypericum ‘Rowallane’ on the opposite side of the garden is in full bloom. Nearby Barbara Mayne is weeding carefully around P. ‘Guinevere’ which grows at the base of a willow support for Rosa ‘William Lobb’ while Lorna Goldstrom, the IGPS co-ordinator for the garden, tackles a bit of last minute pruning. The willow wigwam and the giant hedgehog which can be glimpsed behind the daffodils were specially constructed for the garden by Bob, the Museum’s resident willow weaver.
Lorna Goldstrom and Yvonne Penpraze talking to one of the Museum staff dressed in period costume.

Lorna Goldstrom and Yvonne Penpraze talking to one of the Museum staff dressed in period costume.

Volunteers Barbara Mayne and Lorna Goldstrom with Hypericum 'Rowallane' blooming in the background

Volunteers Barbara Mayne and Lorna Goldstrom with Hypericum ‘Rowallane’ blooming in the background

The Museum acknowledges the Society's work.

The Museum acknowledges the Society’s work.

With thanks to Maeve Bell for text and photographs.

Dedication of Escallonia ‘C. F. Ball’ – Tuesday, 28th June

Dedication of Escallonia ‘C. F. Ball’

This dedication is taking place at the National War Memorial Gardens, Islandbridge, Dublin.
It is a free event organised by the Office of Public Works(OPW) and we would like to see a good number of IGPS attend on the day. 
Tuesday, 28 June 2016 from 14:00 to 16:00 AT THE Irish National War Memorial Gardens
- via Con Colbert Road Islandbridge, Dublin 8, Ireland
Escallonia CF Ball Photograph from httpwww.vivaipriola.it

Escallonia CF Ball         Photograph from httpwww.vivaipriola.it

These gardens, designed by Sir Edward Lutyens, are dedicated to the memory of 49,400 Irish soldiers who died in the First World War. They are in a wonderful setting, along the River Liffey, and adjacent to the Phoenix Park. The gardens contain a sunken Rose Garden which will be at its best in mid-Summer when this event is planned.

Escallonia ‘C F Ball’ is named for Charles Frederick Ball, who was killed at Gallipoli in 1915. Charles Frederick Ball, who trained at Kew Gardens, was an Assistant Keeper at the National Botanic Gardens in Glasnevin  and advised at the Acton estate at Kilmacurragh, now, also, part of the National Botanic Gardens. Escallonia CF Ball is one seedling from several raised by him before the war, another –  ‘Alice’ – is named for his wife.

The Great War caused the demise of numerous gardens as so many staff volunteered for service in the British Army and other Allied Forces, never to return. The Irish Garden Plant Society is pleased to be able to help keep the memory of these people with us. This a free event, open to the public, but we hope that IGPS members who are free on Tuesday afternnoon, the 28th June, will attend to promote this Irish heritage plant.

Entrance to the garden is via Con Colbert Road where there is a small car park. Buses 51,68 and 69 from Aston Quay. Please note there are no facilities at this garden.

For more information on Dublin’s Commemorative Sites visit OPW Dublin Website

‘New and Exciting Herbaceous Perennials from around the World’ with Jimi Blake’

New and Exciting Herbaceous Perennials from around the World’ with Jimi Blake’, in association with Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council.

From left to right: Maeve Bell (IGPS Northern Area Chairperson) Philip Magennis (Arts and Heritage Officer, Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council), Jimi Blake and Barbara Kelso (IGPS Northern Area Committee Member who organises the lecture programme).

From left to right: Maeve Bell (IGPS Northern Area Chairperson) Philip Magennis (Arts and Heritage Officer, Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council), Jimi Blake and Barbara Kelso (IGPS Northern Area Committee Member who organises the lecture programme).

 The Northern Area Committee’s Spring Lecture, New and Exciting Herbaceous Perennials from around the World’ with Jimi Blake’, in association with Antrim and Newtownabbey Borough Council, was an entertaining and inspiring guide through Jimi’s favourite new long flowering perennials as featured in Hunting Brook Gardens. Jimi gave great insights into how to use them in planting schemes and also his own experiences of trialing them in the Irish garden. All of this was accompanied by superb photography of the individual plants and the adventurous and colourful planting combinations which are Jimi’s trademark. Everyone went home with a ticked list of ‘must have’ plants for the coming season and a resolve to seek them out.

An audience of around 140, comprising IGPS members and non-members, packed the Old Courthouse, Antrim, eager to hear Jimi Blake speak at the IGPS Northern Committee’s Spring Lecture.

An audience of around 140, comprising IGPS members and non-members, packed the Old Courthouse, Antrim, eager to hear Jimi Blake speak at the IGPS Northern Committee’s Spring Lecture.

 Hilary Glenn (left) and Maeve Bell (right) after Maeve presented flowers to Hilary to mark the completion of her 10 year term on the regional committee.

Hilary Glenn (left) and Maeve Bell (right) after Maeve presented flowers to Hilary to mark the completion of her 10 year term on the regional committee.

 IGPS Northern Area members after enjoying the Spring Lecture. From left to right: Lorna Greenwood, Maeve Bell, Yvonne Penpraze and Billy McCone after the Spring Lecture.

IGPS Northern Area members after enjoying the Spring Lecture. From left to right: Lorna Greenwood, Maeve Bell, Yvonne Penpraze and Billy McCone after the Spring Lecture.

 

Heritage Irish Plants – Plandaí Oidhreachta: Place a Pre-publication order now! €25

The Irish Society of Botanical Artists and The Irish Garden Plant Society have joined forces in a project titled Plandaí Oidhreachta, which celebrates our Heritage Plants. It highlights the wealth of good Irish Garden Plants and celebrates the beauty of botanical illustration. In late 2016, the end product of the collaboration will be an exhibition of original paintings and an accompanying book. The book will feature articles on a variety of plant themes that highlight Irish Garden Plants, especially those that came to being post the year 2000. Our latest snowdrops, dahlias and sweet pea will be featured along with primroses, iris and daffodils, among others groups of plants, including garden plants selected from the native Irish flora. We are happy to offer Society members and friends the opportunity to support this endeavour by pre-subscribing to the book. Measuring 240 x 260cm and with over 100 pages of content, it will be lavishly illustrated with botanical illustrations both old and new, and printed on high quality, silk-finish paper. Threescore artists, and more have been painting for the book in 2015 and early 2016.

 

The ISBA is handling pre-publication orders of the book: Please visit their website: Irish Botanical Artists for details. Heritae Irish Plants Publication Brochure 1

 

Oliver Schurmann – ‘Prairie Style Gardening in an Irish Climate’

A Report from Adam Whitbourn on Oliver Schurmann’s IGPS Munster lecture  ‘Prairie Style Gardening in an Irish Climate’on Tue 1st March.

Photo: LtoR – Oliver Schurmann (Mount Venus Nursery), Martin Edwardes (IGPS Munster Committee), Adam Whitbourn (IGPS Munster Committee)

Photo: LtoR – Oliver Schurmann (Mount Venus Nursery), Martin Edwardes (IGPS Munster Committee), Adam Whitbourn (IGPS Munster Committee)


Oliver gave an extremely interesting and informative lecture. His passion and knowledge of plants and great eye for design were evident throughout. He described his formative days of training in Germany where he first saw the prairie style of planting which influenced his development as a horticulturalist. He talked about the idea of bringing plant communities into the garden and used various examples of natural meadows and prairies from Ireland and abroad. He made many plant suggestions both as effective combinations and single specimens and took us through some gardens that he had designed and planted. I went away with a long wish list of plants which I will try to source at Oliver’s own Mount Venus Nursery in Rathfarnam, Dublin.

 

Ulster Garden Scheme 2016 – with IGPS Members Involved

In Northern Ireland the very active Ulster Gardens Scheme raises money for local National Trust gardens each year through a series of open gardens. This year eight gardens will open for a day or two days over a weekend at their peak season while another 15 are open by appointment between April and October. As one might expect, IGPS members are to the fore with some opening their gardens for the first time while others could be considered stalwarts of the Scheme.
Neil Porteous, Head Gardener at Mount Stewart, in conversation with Victor Henry, a member of the Society's Northern sub-committee.

Neil Porteous, Head Gardener at Mount Stewart, in conversation with Victor Henry, a member of the Society’s Northern sub-committee.

Katherine Nixon will be opening her new garden near Killinchy, Co Down right on the shore of one of our most beautiful natural landscapes, Strangford Lough, on 6-7th August. Not only is there a chance to see her husband James’s black native Irish bees but there will also be an exhibition of work by invited artists.
Pat Cameron and Sandra Tosh with Knox Gass

Pat Cameron and Sandra Tosh with Knox Gass

Six of our members will be opening their gardens by appointment. Just a mile or two away on the other side of Killinchy village, Knox Gass makes a welcome return to the Scheme when he opens his newly created, plantsperson’s garden for the first time. Also for the first time, Penny McNeill will open her half acre garden near Ballycastle on the north Antrim coast.
Penny McNeill and Cherry Townsend

Penny McNeill and Cherry Townsend

David and Janet Ledsham also garden on the Co Antrim coast but in Ballygally, near Larne and the Northern region have organised a visit to it on Saturday 9th April when we hope to see early spring treasures and maybe a final fling for the hellebores. Members from other regions are, as always, most welcome to join in.
Other gardens owned by Society members and open by appointment are those of Susan and Colin Tindall at Timpanny Nursery near Ballynahinch,  John and Agnes Peacocke just outside Downpatrick, and Adrian Walsh’s bijou city garden in south Belfast.
Mary and Berkley Farr with Charles Stewart

Mary and Berkley Farr with Charles Stewart

The Lough on a hazy February afternoon looking west from Greyabbey village

The Lough on a hazy February afternoon looking west from Greyabbey village

 

Text and photographs from Maeve Bell, Chairperson of the Northern Region of the IGPS

Richard Baines talk in Belfast

About 30 members from the Northern region attended the lecture by Richard Baines, Curator of Logan Botanic Garden, organised by the Alpine Garden Society on Saturday. Logan which is situated just across the North Channel on the Mull of Galloway is one of the four gardens which go to make up the Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh and it specialises in growing render Rhododendrons and Southern Hemisphere plants especially those from Australasia and Chile. I high proportion of its plants are wild collection which is a key factor should reintroduction be required.

Robert Trotter, who has recently joined the Northern sub-committee, with committee member Victor Henry admiring Banksia marginata in full bloom

Robert Trotter, who has recently joined the Northern sub-committee, with committee member Victor Henry admiring Banksia marginata in full bloom

Marion Allen and Victor Henry admiring some of the foliage from Logan brought by the speaker, Richard Baines.

Marion Allen and Victor Henry admiring some of the foliage from Logan brought by the speaker, Richard Baines.

Liam McCaughey, past Chairman of the Alpine Garden Society Ulster Branch and a member of IGPS, enjoying the tea and home made cakes after the lecture.

Liam McCaughey, past Chairman of the Alpine Garden Society Ulster Branch and a member of IGPS, enjoying the tea and home made cakes after the lecture.

Barbara Kelso (right) who organises the Northern region's lecture programme with Agnes Peacocke and Robert Trotter who have recently joined the committee

Barbara Kelso (right) who organises the Northern region’s lecture programme with Agnes Peacocke and Robert Trotter who have recently joined the committee

 

Text and photographs courtesy of Maeve Bell, Chairperson of the Norther Regions of the IGPS.

Bruno Nicolai talking at the National Botanic Gardens

Bruno Nicolai talk at Bots Nov 2015

There was a great attendance at the National Botanic Gardens on Thursday, 19th November when Bruno Nicolai spoke about his garden of exotic planting in Cork.